Bachelor study

Lectures are in Czech language only.


Study plan

students admitted from academic year 2019/2020  |  students admitted before academic year 2019/2020
 

1. grade

winter semester

CodeCourse nameP/C/LExaminationCredits
Compulsory courses
B101001 General and Inorganic Chemistry I

Annotation

The contents of the subject covers basic topics of general chemistry – atom structure, periodicity in properties, chemical bond theory, stereochemistry of molecules and basic chemical equilibrium. These principles are used for description of reactivity and properties of essential groups of inorganic substances. Systematic part is explained not as chemistry of elements but as chemistry of inorganic phases. Basic discussed categories are molecular gaseous and liquid substances, ions in aqueous solution and their salts, metals and intermetallic phases, solid oxides and inorganic polymers, carbides, nitrides and other solid compounds of metals.

Syllabus

  1. Structure of substances. Structure of atom.
  2. Periodic law and the periodic system of elements.
  3. Chemical bond and chemical reactions.
  4. Elemental non-metals. Chemical bonding, properties and reactivity.
  5. Polyatomic molecules of non-metals - structure, chemical bonding and properties.
  6. Gaseous and liquid molecular compounds of nonmetals.
  7. Monoatomic ions in aqueous solutions and their salts.
  8. Oxoanions in agueous solutions and crystals.
  9. Coordination compounds.
  10. Structure, chemical bonding and properties of metals.
  11. Metals and intermetallic phases - reactivity, extraction and uses.
  12. Solid oxides and inorganic polymers.
  13. Binary solid compounds of metals and non-metals.
3/3/0 z, Zk 8
B413001 Mathematics A

Annotation

Basic course in Calculus for students in bachelor program. It provides mathematical skills necessary for other subjects (physics, physical chemistry,...) in bachelor program. Success in Mathematics I is a prerequisite for Mathematics II.

Syllabus

  1. Functions of a single real variable. Domain and range. Graphs of elementary functions. Basic properties. Composition of functions.
  2. Inverse functions. Exponential and logarithmic functions. Trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions.
  3. Continuity of a function. Properties of continuous functions. Limits of sequences and functions.
  4. Derivatives. Geometrical and physical meaning of derivatives. Rules for computing derivatives. Differential of a function.
  5. Physical and geometrical applications of derivatives. L’Hospital’s rule. Approximation of a function value using Taylor polynomial. Analysis and graphing of a function.
  6. Numerical solution of an equation of a single uknown variable - Newton’s method.
  7. Antiderivatives and their properties. Newton definite integral, its properties and geometrical meaning.
  8. Methods for computing indefinite and definite integrals – integration by parts and substitution method.
  9. Integration of rational functions. Improper integrals. Numerical integration – trapezoidal method.
  10. Definition of definite integral in physics – Riemann integral. Selected geometrical and physical applications of the integral.
  11. Differential equations. Terminology, general and particular solution. Separation of variables.
  12. First order linear differential equations. Variation of constants. Numerical solution of a first order differential equations – Euler’s method.
  13. First and second order linear differential equations with constant coefficients and a special right-hand. Estimation method.
  14. Application of differential equations in Physics, Chemistry, and Biochemistry. Revision and discussion.
3/4/0 z, Zk 8
B320003 Biology I

Annotation

The course provides overview of features shared by living systems, origin of life and development of livings and introduces the structure and function relationship at the levels ranging from molecular entities, through organization of the (particularly eukaryotic) cell and tissues to the relationship of organisms in an ecosystem. It further provides an insight into mechanisms underlying, transmission and expression of genetic information, heredity, ontogenesis of the cell and organism and evolution and introduces the diversity of modern organisms.

Syllabus

  1. Science of Biology; Origin of Life and Hierarchy of Biological Organization
  2. The Chemistry of Life - Water, Structure and Functions of (Macro)Molecules of Life
  3. Viruses; Biological Membrane
  4. The Cell and Evolution of the Cell; Non-Organellar Structures of Cell
  5. The Organelles of Cell
  6. Cell Reproduction and Ontogenesis
  7. Genetics - Chromosomal and Molecular Bases of Heredity
  8. Mechanisms of Evolution
  9. Diversity of Organisms
  10. Plant Anatomy and Function
  11. Plant Reproduction and Development
  12. Animal Histology
  13. Animal Reproduction and Development
  14. Ecology and Ecosystems
2/0/0 Zk 3
B143003 Programming in shell

Annotation

The course is focused on programming in a shell - a command line of Linux operating system. In a series of practical exercises, students will learn to use basic commands and advanced tools of the shell. They gain skills and techniques of writing scripts for automated and efficient data processing.

Syllabus

  1. Introduction. Command line. Shell control. Working with commands. Manual pages and other documentation.
  2. Manipulation with files and directories. Searching.
  3. Input, output and redirection. Expansion operators.
  4. User permissions.
  5. Regular expressions.
  6. Manipulation with text.
  7. Advanced text transformations.
  8. Structure of shell script. Sequence of commands.
  9. Construction of conditions.
  10. Construction of loops.
  11. Arithmetic and logic operations.
  12. Arrays.
  13. Functions.
  14. Processes. Archivation and compression.
0/3/0 kz 4
B500001  BI-PA1 Programming and Algorithmics 1

Annotation

Students gain the ability to formulate algorithms for solving basic problems and write them in the C language. They understand data types (simple, structured, pointers), expressions, statements, functions, concept of recursion. They learn to analyse simple cases of algorithm complexity. They know fundamental algorithms for searching, sorting, and manipulating with linked lists.

Syllabus

  1. Algorithm, program, programming languages. Development environments.
  2. Variables, assignment statement, input and output for integer data types.
  3. Data types for real numbers. Expressions.
  4. Control structures, branching, cycles.
  5. Functions, input/output parameters.
  6. Decomposition of a problem into subproblems, recursion.
  7. Arrays, strings.
  8. Pointers, dynamic variables.
  9. Files.
  10. Complexity of algorithms, sorting and searching.
  11. Structures, structured files.
  12. Linked lists.
  13. Modular programming, other features of C.
2/4/0 z, Zk 6

summer semester

CodeCourse nameP/C/LExaminationCredits
Compulsory courses
B110003 Organic Chemistry I

Annotation

The structure - reactivity concept is involved in the modern teaching of organic chemistry of the main groups of hydrocarbons and their monofunctional derivatives: alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, arenes, and their halo derivatives, alcohols and phenols, carbonyl compounds, carboxylic acids and functional derivatives of carboxylic acids.

Syllabus

  1. Introduction, main classes of organic compounds, principles of the systematic nomeclature.
  2. Oxidation numbers. Bonding and particles in organic chemistry. Electronic effects. Writing the mechanisms.
  3. Alkanes, cycloalkanes. Physical and chemical properties. Conformation and configuration. Radical substitution.
  4. Halogenalkanes. Physical properties. Nucleophilic substitution. Effect of substrate and nucleophile.
  5. Organic stereochemistry. Stereochemistry of nucleophilic substitution and elimination.
  6. Organometallic compounds (Mg, Li). Formation and application of organometallic compounds in addition and alkylation reactions.
  7. Alkenes. Physical and chemical properties. Electrophilic and radical addition reactions, regioselectivity and stereochemistry.
  8. Alkynes. Structure and acidity. Alkylation of anion. Oxo-enol tautomerism. Acids and bases in organic chemistry.
  9. Dienes, structural types, conformational and optical isomerism. Electrophilic and radical addition reactions, kinetic and thermodynamic control. Cycloaddition reactions, principles.
  10. Arenes. Structure, aromaticity. Physical properties. Electrophilic substitution, mechanism and regioselectivity, effect of substituents. Reaction in side chain.
  11. Alcohols and phenols, structure and physical properties. Reactions of alcohols with hydrogen halides. Ethers and their reactivity.
  12. Carbonyl compounds. Nucleophilic addition reactions. Enolates.
  13. Carboxylic acids. Structure, acidity. Principles of nuclephilic acyl substitution. Transformation of acylchlorides, esters and anhydrides.
  14. Amines, structure, bazicity and nucleophilicity. Reactions of amines as bases and nucleophiles.
3/2/0 z, Zk 6
B444003 Physics I

Annotation

The course is aimed at understanding the fundamental physical phenomena and the development of technical thinking. The laws of physics and physical principles, that are essential for connecting objects in a bachelor study program, are discussed and explained.

Syllabus

  1. Introduction: Physical quatities, The International System of Units.
  2. Basic concepts of Mechanics I: Force, the Newton's laws, work, power, kinetic and potential energy. Conservation of mechanical energy and linear momentum, elastic and inelastic collisions.
  3. Basic concepts of Mechanics II: Moment of inertia, torque, angular momentum. Work, power and energy in rotational motion. Rolling motion of rigid bodies. Static equilibrium conditions, center of gravity.
  4. Continuum and fluid mechanics: Forces in continuum, deformation, Hooke's law. Hydrostatic presure, Archimedes' law. Bernoulli's equation, real liquid flow.
  5. Oscillations: undamped, damped and forced harmonic oscillations. Composed oscillations.
  6. Waves: Description, propagation velocity, intensity. Huygen's principle, refraction and reflection, Snell's law. Interference, standing waves.
  7. Wave optics: Concept of light, interference, thin film, sigle-slit diffraction, diffraction grating, polarization, optical activity.
  8. Geometric optics: Basic concepts, reflection and refraction, optical instruments: magnifying glass, microscope.
  9. Electrostatic field: Coulomb's law. Electric dipole. Potential, voltage, work. Capacitor, dielectric polarization. Charge motion in an electric field.
  10. Direct current circuits: Ohm's law, Joule's law. Kirchhoff's rules. Current, voltage and resistance measurements.
  11. Magnetic field: Magnetic force. Mass spectrograph, electric measurement instruments, cyclotron, the Hall effect. Biot-Savart law, Ampere's law. Magnetic fields in matter.
  12. Electromagnetic field: Electromagnetic induction, proper and mutual inductance. Electromagnetic waves, energy of electromagnetic field.
  13. Alternating current circuits: Generator. Power. Impedance, phase shift, serial resonance circuit.
  14. Basic concepts of modern physics: Blackbody radiation, Stefan-Boltzmann radiation law, Planck radiation law, absorption, emission, laser. The photoelectric effect, X-rays, X-ray diffraction.
3/2/0 z, Zk 6
B413002 Mathematics B

Annotation

The course develops and strengthens the concepts and skills of elementary mathematics (the course of mathematics MI), particularly the skills related to various disciplines of the curriculum of the master's study.

Syllabus

  1. Vectors and matrices, matrix arithmetic, dot and cross product. Linear independence of vectors and rank of a matrix.
  2. Determinant of a matrix. Inverse matrices. Eigenvalues of a matrix.
  3. Systems of linear algebraic equations. Geometry in the plane and three-dimensional space.
  4. Euclidean space, metric, norm, properties of subsets of the Eucidean space.
  5. Functions of several variables. Partial derivatives, partial derivatives of compositions of functions. Directional derivatives, gradient of a function. Total differential, tangent plane.
  6. Taylor polynomial of functions of two variables. Newton’s method for a system of two non-linear equations of two variables.
  7. Extrema of functions of two variables. Linear regression – least square method.
  8. Implicitly defined functions of a single and several variables, derivatives of implicitly defined functions.
  9. Parametric curves, tangent vector to a curve, smooth curve, orientation and a sum of curves.
  10. Systems of two first order differential equations. Solving autonomous systems of differential equations with constant coefficients. Predator-prey model.
  11. Vector field in the plane and space. Curvilinear integral of a vector field and its physical meaning.
  12. Path independence of the curvilinear integral of a vector field. Scalar potential of a vector field. Differential forms and their integrals.
  13. Double integral and its geometrical meaning. Fubini theorem. Substitution for double integral. Polar coordinates.
  14. Laplace integral. Revision and discussion.
3/3/0 z, Zk 7
B834001 Professional English Language A

Annotation

The aim of the course is to develop all language skills, with focus on the field of professional language and its specific features. The topics cover academic life, general chemistry, laboratory work and processing technologies in relation to the environment.

Syllabus

  1. Starting the course - introduction
  2. University Study: The Past and Present of the University of Chemical Technology. Sentence structure.
  3. University Study: Studying abroad. Erasmus. Verb tenses.
  4. University Study: Specialization. Sequence of tenses.
  5. Chemistry: Chemistry basics. Matter, states of matter, atom. Passive voice
  6. Chemistry: Periodic table and characteristics of elements. Relative clauses.
  7. Chemistry: Basics of English inorganic chemistry nomenclature; basic mathematical symbols.
  8. Chemical Laboratory: Lab equipment. Word formation using affixes.
  9. Chemical Laboratory: Lab safety rules. Linking words.
  10. Chemical Laboratory: Chemical experiments, instructions. Infinitive structures.
  11. Environment: Traditional and alternative energy sources.
  12. Environment: Water sources, water purification. Chemical and biological methods of waste water treatment.
  13. Environment: Fuels and resources.Oil and gas wells. Shale gas extraction.
  14. General revision.
0/2/0 z 1
B500002 Object-oriented Programming in Java

Annotation

Object-oriented Programming in Java introduces the concept of the object-oriented programming and Java programming language to the students.

Syllabus

  1. Introduction to OOP and Java, history, development and Java concepts.
  2. OOP, variables, expressions, primitives, classes and objects.
  3. Classes, objects, inheritance, catching and handling exceptions, try-catch and Autoclosable in Java 7, Run Time Type Identification.
  4. Arrays in Java and java.util.Arrays API, collections and JCF.
  5. Input and Output, files and streams, serialization, java.io and java.nio libraries.
  6. Threads and processes, interaction, synchronization, programming of multi-threaded applications.
  7. Java and Internet, net communication, client-server architecture.
  8. Graphical user interface in Java, AWT, Swing, layout managers, events, containers and components, listeners and adapters.
  9. Swing, applets and images.
  10. Databases, JDBC, interfaces Connection, Statement, PreparedStatement and ResultSet.
  11. Remote Method Invocation, inner and nested classes, local classes.
  12. Differences between Java versions 5 and 7, Enum, generics.
  13. Documentation, JAR, logging, regular expression in Java, JNI.
2/5/0 z, Zk 7
B319001 Biology II

Annotation

The subject Biology II is an independent continuation of the subject Biology I and is aimed at deepening the knowledge of general biology and cell biology with an emphasis on an understanding of the relationships between structures and functions and the interconnections of cellular processes. On the representatives of all three domains of life on Earth, both the diversity of cell types and the existence of common mechanisms will be presented. Part of the Biology II introduces basic and advanced tools of analysis of individual cells and cell populations. A couple of presentations are devoted to ecology, biogeochemical cycles, and active discussion with students on current issues related to the topics included in the subject.

Syllabus

  1. Cell diversity
  2. Overview of cell types and their comparison
  3. Methods of study of individual cells and populations - basic microscopic techniques
  4. Methods of individual cell and population studies - advanced cell analysis tools
  5. Auto-organization of cellular structures
  6. Structure and function of the cell surface
  7. Cell nucleus architecture
  8. Structure of the cell genome, DNA condensation, chromatin remodeling
  9. Cell cycle, reproduction of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell type
  10. Cell adaptation and differentiation
  11. Intercellular interactions
  12. Ecology and ecosystems
  13. Biogeochemical cycles
  14. Discussion on publicly popular topics related to cell biology
2/0/0 Zk 3

2. grade

winter semester

CodeCourse nameP/C/LExaminationCredits
Compulsory courses
B403003 Physical Chemistry I

Annotation

The subject covers elementary parts of physical chemistry (i.e. basic ideas and quantities, state behaviour, fundamentals of thermodynamics) which are followed by chapters on phase equlibria and chemical equilibria. Basic principles of behaviour and properties of electrolytes are introduced. The final part is devoted to kinetics of chemical reactions.

Syllabus

  1. Basic terminology, thermodynamic system, thermodynamic process, state properties.
  2. State behaviour of gases, equation of state of ideal gas. Real gas and its behaviour.
  3. 1st law of thermodynamics. Internal energy, heat, work.
  4. Enthalpy, heat of reaction, standard enthalpy of formation. Hess and Kirchhoff's laws.
  5. 2nd law of thermodynamics, entropy. Entropy changes on selected processes.
  6. Helmholtz and Gibbs energy, their significance. 3rd law of thermodynamics.
  7. Partial molar quantities, activity, chemical potential, standard states.
  8. Phase equilibria in single-component systems, Clapeyron equation.
  9. Gibbs phase law, vapour-liquid equilibrium in ideal systems, phase diagrams.
  10. Solubility of gases in liquids, equilibria in condensed systems.
  11. Material balance of chemical reactions. Equilibrium constant. Equilibria in electrolyte systems.
  12. Equilibrium composition. Reactions in gaseous phase.
  13. Faraday´s law, galvanic cells, Nernst equation.
  14. Basic terms of chemical kinetics, reaction rate, integration of rate equations.
3/2/0 z, Zk 6
B320001 Biochemistry I

Annotation

Subject is focused on understanding of basic principles of biochemistry; it means structure and function of different biological molecules as well as metabolism.

Syllabus

  1. Living systems, their composition and organization
  2. Amino acids (properties, determination and reaction) and peptides
  3. Proteins (relation between structure and function)
  4. Enzymes: Structure, nomenclature, classification into classes
  5. Reaction kinetics of enzymatic reactions, regulation of enzyme activity
  6. Chemistry of nucleotides and nucleic acids; replication
  7. Transcription, translation, and posttranslational modifications
  8. Chemistry of lipids. Biomembranes and membrane transport
  9. The principles of metabolism and energy conversion; bioenergetics
  10. Aerobic and anaerobic respiration, Light phase of photosynthesis
  11. Citrate and glyoxylate cycle
  12. Chemistry of carbohydrates. Metabolism of Carbohydrates I.
  13. Metabolism of Carbohydrates II. Metabolism of lipids.
  14. Metabolism of nitrogenous substances
3/1/0 z, Zk 5
B834002 Professional English Language B

Annotation

The aim of the course is to develop communication skills with special focus on the specific features of professional language, to enhance the acquired knowledge of grammar and vocabulary. The covered topics include food processing, drug production and administration, and properties of materials.

Syllabus

  1. Guide to presentations.
  2. Food: Food preservation methods.
  3. Food: Additives. Expressing different degrees of agreement / disagreement.
  4. Food: Genetically modified food.
  5. Food: Nanotechnology in food production and processing. Countable and uncountable nouns, quantifiers.
  6. Drugs: Pharmacology - pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. If clauses.
  7. Drugs: Administration of drugs.
  8. Drugs: Pharmaceutical industry, drugs and their development. Irregular plurals of nouns of Greek and Latin origin.
  9. Drugs: Drug addiction, the effect of drugs on human body. Description of drugs.
  10. Materials: Polymers and smart materials - definition, description.
  11. Materials: Aerogels. Instructions on how to make a material.
  12. Materials: Graphene. Comparison of different materials in terms of their properties.
  13. Materials: Restoration. Shapes and description of two-dimensional and three-dimensional objects. Interpretation of graphs.
  14. General revision
0/2/0 z, Zk 2
B101009 Bioinformatics: Specialisation Laboratory I

Annotation

Students will learn about laboratory safety, basic laboratory equipment and experimental procedures used in inorganic and organic chemistry. Preparations and qualitative reactions will complement the theoretical knowledge of properties of elements and inorganic compounds. Working on several simple organic syntheses, students will acquire the requisite skills for the preparation and characterization of organic compounds. Final grade is based not only on the performance in the laboratory, but also on the knowledge of simple calculations (stoichiometry and preparation of solutions) and the chemical principles of procedures carried out.

Syllabus

  1. Laboratory safety, rules, and protocols.
  2. Basic inorganic laboratory equipment.
  3. Basic laboratory procedures - dissolution, filtration, evaporation, precipitation, and decantation.
  4. Basic laboratory operations - crystallization, weighing, determination of density, pH measurement.
  5. Redox reactions - carrying out in solution and solid phase.
  6. Chemistry of nonmetals - reactions of nonmetals and their compounds.
  7. Important qualitative reactions of selected anions, their determination in an unknown sample.
  8. Basic organic laboratory equipment.
  9. Building of reaction apparatuses and basic operations in organic synthesis.
  10. Selected one-step organic syntheses including isolation and identification of products, heating with stirring under a reflux condenser.
  11. Crystallization in organic laboratory.
  12. Extraction.
  13. Distillation under ambient pressure.
  14. Determination of melting point, GLC chromatography of compounds prepared.
0/0/3 kz 2
B500008  BI-AG1 Algorithms and Graphs 1

Annotation

The course covers the basic principles of creating efficient algorithms, data structures and graph theory that every computing expert should know.

Syllabus

  1. Motivation and introduction to graph theory
  2. Basic definitions and concepts of graph theory I
  3. Basic definitions and concepts of graph theory II
  4. Sorting algorithms O(n^2). Binary heaps and HeapSort.
  5. Dynamic fields, amortized complexity, binomial heaps
  6. Search trees and their balancing
  7. Probabilistic algorithms and their complexity. QuickSort.
  8. Recursive algorithms and divide and conquer. Linear sorting
  9. Hashing and searching tables
  10. Dynamic programming
  11. Graph minimum spanning tree
  12. Shortest paths in graphs
  13. Reserve
2/2/0 z, Zk 6
B143008 Python Programming

Annotation

In this course students will gain knowledge of programming language Python, its datatype system and accompanying programming constructs. Text and binary data processing together with Python specific approach will be emphasized. Also information about changes between 2.x and 3.x versions of Python language will be discussed.

Syllabus

  1. History and overview of Python.
  2. Basic data structures and control flow tools. Exceptions.
  3. Functions and their special role in Python.
  4. Modules and their usage.
  5. Classes. Magic methods.
  6. Textual and binary input/output. Serialization of data structures.
  7. User input. Subprocess handling. Foreign function interface.
  8. Testing and debugging.
  9. Selected internal and external libraries.
2/2/0 z, Zk 5
Compulsorily optional courses
B110004 Organic Chemistry II

Annotation

This course is continuation of Organic chemistry I. The course of Organic chemistry II is based on the description of organic reactions according to the mechanistic principles. It also includes chemistry of natural compounds (carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, nucleic acids) as well as basics of heterocyclic chemistry.

Syllabus

  1. Organic reactions, types, mechanisms, acid-base equilibrium.
  2. Nucleophilic substitution on saturated carbon. Mechanism, stereochemistry, applications.
  3. Elimination E1 and E2. Mechanism, stereochemistry, application.
  4. Nucleophilic addition on unsaturated carbon.
  5. Nucleophilic substitution on unsaturated carbon.
  6. Carboxamides.
  7. Nucleophilic substitution on aromatic compounds.
  8. Electrophilic additions on unsaturated systems.
  9. Electrophilic substitution on unsaturated systems.
  10. Radical reactions, halogenation, additions of HBr and thiols.
  11. Oxidation and reduction.
  12. Aminoacids, peptides. Structure, chemical properties, synthesis.
  13. Carbohydrides. Structure, stereochemistry, chemical properties.
  14. Heterocycles. Basic types of five and six membered heterocycles, synthesis and reactivity.
3/2/0 z, Zk 6
B111005 Fundamentals of Pharmacology

Annotation

Basic Pharmacology is focused on obtaining fundamental information regarding interaction between drug and biological system (organism). The subject is divided into two basic areas: (1) general pharmacology, which is focused on the general aspects of the interaction between chemical substance (drug molecule) and is subdivided on the pharmacokinetics which studied mentioned interaction from the time point of view e.g. fate of the drug in the body and pharmacodynamics which studied the effect and mechanism of the effect of the drug in the body), and (2) special pharmacology, where students learn about the effects of basic pharmacological groups of pharmacs on organism (e.g. Analgesics, Anestetics, Sedatives, Hypnotics, Sympatomietics, Sympatolytics, Parasympathomimetics, Parasympatholytics, etc.).

Syllabus

  1. Introduction. Common terms and definitions in pharmacology
  2. The fate of drugs administered to an organism - basics of pharmacokinetics
  3. The effects of drugs on an organism - basics of pharmacodynamics
  4. Adverse drug effects
  5. Drugs affecting the central nervous system: general anesthetics, sedatives, hypnotics
  6. Drugs affecting the central nervous system: psychiatric medication, psychoactive drugs
  7. Drugs affecting the peripheral nervous system: sympathomimetic and sympatholytic drugs
  8. Drugs affecting the peripheral nervous system: parasympathomimetic and parasympatholytic drugs, local anesthetics, muscle relaxants
  9. Drugs used to relieve pain (painkillers)
  10. Drugs affecting the cardiovascular system
  11. Drugs acting on the gastrointestinal tract and the renal system
  12. Drugs acting on the respiratory system
  13. Antiviral drugs and anticancer agents
  14. Chemotherapeutic drugs used in treating infectious diseases
2/0/0 Zk 3
B444004 Physics II

Annotation

The subject Physics II builds on the subject Physics I and is dedicated to selected topics in electromagnetic field theory, quantum mechanics, solid state physics, nuclear physics and elementary particle physics. The content of the subject is adjusted to give the students the foundation required to proceed to following courses of the Bachelor study program.

Syllabus

  1. Inertial and non-inertial frames of reference, relativistic dynamics, the principle of equivalence.
  2. Electromagnetic field: Gauss´law, induced electric fields, induced magnetic fields,dielectrics, magnetic materials, Maxwell's equations.
  3. Electromagnetic waves: Traveling, intenzity, energy transport, polarization, optical activity.
  4. Photons and the wave nature of particles: Compton effect, particle-wave duality, de Broglie wavelength, the uncertainty principle.
  5. Roots of the quantum theory: Schrödinger equation,interpretation of the wave function, probability density, operators.
  6. Solution of the Schrödinger equation I: Particle in infinite potential well, energy level diagram.
  7. Solutions of the Schrödinger equation II: Harmonic oscillator, tunneling.
  8. The hydrogen atom I: Bohr theory,energy level diagram, series of spectral lines.
  9. The hydrogen atom II: Quantum solution, hydrogen atom wave functions, energy eigenvalues,radial probality density, quantum numbers.
  10. Atom in magnetic field: The Zeeman effect, electron spin, splitting of the spectral line.
  11. Many - electron atoms: central field approximation, Pauli exclusion principle, electronic configuration, Hund's rules.
  12. Fundamentals of solid state physics I: Band model, Fermi energy, intrinsic and doped semiconductor, PN transition.
  13. Fundamentals of solid state physics II: Contact phenomenon, Seebeck effect, Peltier effect, piezoelectricity, photo diodes.
  14. Fundamentals of nuclear physics: Properties of nuclei, radioactivity, nuclear reactions. Elementary particles: fermions and bosons, quarks and leptons, forces.
2/2/0 z, Zk 5

summer semester

CodeCourse nameP/C/LExaminationCredits
Compulsory courses
B320002 Biochemistry II

Annotation

The subject forms an extention of the basic course of Biochemistry I. It should bring students to a wider understanding of biological and biochemical consequences. Therefore, the topics of lectures reflect knowledge from different areas of biochemistry (structure of biopolymers, molecular genetics, metabolism by bioanalytical methods etc).

Syllabus

  1. The story of contemporary biochemistry
  2. Metabolism and transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide
  3. Biochemistry of essential factors
  4. Regulation of enzyme activity
  5. Hormones and transfer of information across biological membranes
  6. Coordination of metabolic functions in multicellular organism
  7. Eukaryotic cells Biochemistry I - organelles
  8. Eukaryotic cells Biochemistry II - cytoskeleton
  9. Biochemistry phototrophic organisms
  10. Biochemistry chemotrophic microorganisms
  11. Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology
  12. Biochemistry in medicine I (Clinical Biochemistry)
  13. Biochemistry in medicine II (biochemical causes of certain diseases)
  14. Historical Overview of Biochemistry
2/0/0 Zk 3
B402001 Analytical Chemistry I

Annotation

Lectured methods include both classical chemical as well as instrumental techniques. The electrochemical analysis (potentiometry, voltammetry, polarography, coulometry), separation methods (gas and liquid chromatography) and atomic and molecular spectroscopy (atomic absorption and/or emission spectroscopy, infrared, visible and UV absorption, spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy) are lectured. Separate lecture is devoted to mass spectrometry and another one to quality assurance procedures in analytical chemistry. The seminars are focused on gravimetric and titration calculations, calculation of equilibria, using of Nernst and/or Lambert-Beers Law and evaluation of basic characteristics of separation processes. The Analytical chemistry I is followed by Analytical chemistry II in next semester, which is application oriented.

Syllabus

  1. Basic terms in analytical chemistry, equilibria in aqueous solutions
  2. Equilibria in aqueous solutions, pH
  3. Volumetric and gravimetric analysis
  4. Electroanalytical methods
  5. Electroanalytical methods
  6. Principles of spectrometry, spectrometric instrumentation
  7. Atomic spectrometry
  8. Molecular spectrometry
  9. Molecular spectrometry
  10. Extraction, principles of chromatography
  11. Principles of chromatography, gas chromatography
  12. Liquid chromatography, electrophoresis
  13. Mass spectrometry
  14. Errors of analytical measurements
2/2/0 z, Zk 5
B143002 Essential Bioinformatics

Annotation

The course introduces a multidisciplinary field of bioinformatics. Bioinformatics deals with the methods for storing, retrieving and analyzing biological data, such as nucleic acid (DNA/RNA) and protein sequence, structure, function, pathways and genetic interactions. Students will be introduced to the basic concepts of bioinformatics and computational biology. Hands-on sessions will familiarize students with the details and use of common online tools and resources.

Syllabus

  1. Genomics, genome mapping and sequencing, human genome project
  2. Pairwise sequence alignment - homology and similarity, basic principles of alignment
  3. Pairwise sequence alignment - scoring, substitution matrices PAM and BLOSUM, dot plot
  4. Searching in sequence databases, BLAST
  5. Multiple sequence alignment - scoring and creation
  6. Position specific substitution matrices, profiles and Hidden Markov Models, PSI-BLAST
  7. Molecular phylogenetic analysis - molecular evolution, phylogenetic trees, models of evolution
  8. Molecular phylogenetic analysis - methods of phylogenetic trees construction, evaluationg phylogenetic trees
  9. Gene detection in eukaryotes and prokaryotes, prediction of introns and exons
  10. DNA microarrays, gene expressionanalysis
  11. Structure of biomacromolecules - Protein Databank, protein structure classification - SCOP and CATH
  12. Prediction of the secondary protein structure
  13. Prediction of the tertiary protein structure - homology modeling, threading, ab initio methods, CASP
  14. RNA structure and its prediction
2/2/0 z, Zk 5
B143006 Computational systems management

Annotation

The course is based on a series of practical exercises in the field of computational systems management. Students will be acquainted with the architecture and technical equipment of computers. The course provides an overview of the function of computational systems, computer networks and operating systems. Attention is also focused on the importance and principles of software development, its categorization and relation to hardware.

Syllabus

  1. Logic circuits.
  2. Architecture of computational systems.
  3. Hardware. Components of computational systems. Peripherals.
  4. Software. Development methodology. Testing.
  5. Operating systems. Function and structure of resource system manager.
  6. Installation and management of operating system.
  7. File systems. Data backup. External storage.
  8. Cryptography and hashing. Principles and corresponding data structures.
  9. Version control systems.
  10. Computer networks. Models, architecture and infrastructure.
  11. Network communication protocols.
  12. Data communication. Transmission media.
  13. Computational models and remote access.
  14. Virtualization.
0/0/3 kz 3
B500004  BI-DBS Database Systems

Annotation

Students are introduced to the database engine architecture and typical user roles. They are briefly introduced to various database models. They learn to design small databases (including integrity constraints) using a conceptual model and implement them in a relational database engine. They get a hands-on experience with the SQL language, as well as with its theoretical foundation - the relational database model. They learn the principles of normalizing a relational database schema. They understand the fundamental concepts of transaction processing, controlling parallel user access to a single data source, as well as recovering a database engine from a failure. They are briefly introduced to special ways of storing data in relational databases with respect to speed of access to large quantities of data. This introductory-level course does not cover: Administration of database systems, debugging and optimizing database applications, distributed database systems, data stores.

Syllabus

  1. Bulk data processing concepts. DBMS architecture. Functions of individual components.
  2. Data abstraction. Conceptual, database and physical level data model.
  3. Conceptual data model. Basic constructs, integrity constraints.
  4. Overview of database models - network, hierarchical, relational and object-relational model.
  5. Relational data model. Relation, attributes, domains, relational database schema, DDL SQL.
  6. Expressing integrity constraints through functional dependencies. Normal forms of relations.
  7. Database query languages. Relational algebra, SQL.
  8. SQL: DDL, DCL, DML.
  9. Relational schema design. Normalization using decomposition. Decomposition quality criteria.
  10. Relational database schema design using a direct transformation from a conceptual schema.
  11. Transactions, error recovery, concurrency control, data security and integrity.
  12. Physical data model, tables as heaps, Rowid direct access, B* tree type index, bitmap index, indexed cluster, hashed cluster.
2/3/0 z, Zk 6
B320007 Microbiology

Annotation

This course is focused on basic microbiology problems. Students will learn about microbial classification based on physiology and genetic properties, basic cell structure, cytology and morphology of bacteria, yeasts and fungi. They will study viruses at the levels of their molecular biology and genetics and their interactions with the host organism. Our coverage will focus almost entirely on viruses that infect humans and cause serious diseases. Students gain a detailed understanding of microbial metabolism and its importance for biotechnology processes. Another topic of this course is kinetic of bacterial growth and effects of outer factors on growth and reproduction of microorganisms. The basic genetic principles from the microbiology point of view will be revised (structure and function of nucleic acids, transfer of genetic information and its expression, mutations, recombination and non chromosomal heritability).

Syllabus

  1. The significant role of microorganism in nature and industry, microbiology taxonomy and nomenclature.
  2. How we divide microorganisms based on physiological characteristics, microbial cell structure, bacteria: morphology, cytology and role of cell structures - I.
  3. How we divide microorganisms based on physiological characteristics, microbial cell structure, bacteria: morphology, cytology and role of cell structures - II.
  4. Yeast: morphology, cytology, vegetative and sexual reproduction. The chemical composition of yeast cells. Yeast taxonomy and their important role in biotechnology and food industry.
  5. Fungi: morphology, cytology, vegetative and sexual reproduction. The chemical composition of fungi cells.
  6. Fungi taxonomy and their important role in biotechnology and food industry.
  7. Viruses. Structure and classification of viruses (DNA x RNA, host - bacteria, plant, animal), morphology, life cycle.
  8. Microbial metabolism and its importance for biotechnology.
  9. Catabolic and anabolic pathways of chemoorganotrophic microorganism.
  10. The effect of environment on microbial growth and reproduction. Nutrition: source and microbial cell reception of nutrient. Temperature, pH, water activity.
  11. Growth and reproduction dynamics of microbial population: growth curve, growth rate, continuous cultivation principles, synchronized culture.
  12. Microbial genetic: basic characteristic of heritability, transfer and expression of genetic information, mutation, recombination and non chromosomal heritability.
  13. Principles of good laboratory and manufacture practice in food industry (GLP, GMP). Sanitation aspect of food technology. Disinfection - the effect of antimicrobial agents.
  14. Microorganisms and environment. The use of microorganisms for protecting of environment. Bacterial taxonomy.
3/0/0 Zk 4
Compulsorily optional courses
B403004 Physical Chemistry II

Annotation

The course deals with selected chapters of physical chemistry on advanced level. Knowledge acquired in the basic course Physical Chemistry I is extended to real-behaving systems. Subjects covered involve state behavior of matter, thermodynamics of fluids, phase and chemical equilibria, properties of electrolyte-containing systems, chemical kinetics, and basic concepts of surface chemistry.

Syllabus

  1. Molecular approach to physical chemistry.
  2. Equations of state for real fluids, theorem of corresponding states.
  3. Energetics of chemical reactions, enthalpy balance.
  4. Implications of I. and II. Laws of thermodynamics, temperature and presseure dependences of state functions.
  5. Thermodynamics of irreversible processes, heat engines, liquefacation of gases.
  6. Thermodynamics of solutions, fugacity, activity.
  7. Phase equilibia in real systems.
  8. Spontaneous chemical change and Gibbs energy, chemical equilibrium in systems of various types.
  9. Theory of electrolytic dissociation, equilibria in electrolyte solutions.
  10. Difusion, migration of ions in electric field, conductivity, Kohlrausch law.
  11. Reversible galvanic cells, types of electrodes, galvanic cells as power sources.
  12. Kinetics of simultaneous reactions, kinetics and chemical equilibrium.
  13. Reaction mechanisms; photochemical,radical, and catalyzed reactions.
  14. Introduction to surface chemistry.
3/2/0 z, Zk 6
B111011 Trends in Drug Research and Development

Annotation

The subject presents the particular periods of the drug discovery process from searching for active structures to clinical testing. Emphasis is placed on the mutual relationships between biological activity of drugs, their chemical structures and physico-chemical properties.

Syllabus

  1. A historical overview of drug discovery
  2. The drug development process, preclinical and clinical testing
  3. Current trends in drug discovery, biologics, management of drug research and development
  4. Development of generic drugs, relationships between original and generic companies
  5. Modifications of drug structures, structure-activity relationships
  6. The LADME model, pharmacokinetics
  7. Pharmacodynamics, Drug-receptor interactions
  8. Physico-chemical properties of drugs and their parametrization
  9. QSAR and its practical impacts, regression analysis, QSAR descriptors
  10. Interpretation of regression relationships, dependent and independent variables, collinearity of parameters, selection of structure changes
  11. Current QSAR approaches, the CoMFA method, similarity models, lead structures identification, molecular modelling
2/0/0 z, Zk 3

3. grade

winter semester

CodeCourse nameP/C/LExaminationCredits
Compulsory courses
B320015 Molecular genetics and DNA analysis

Annotation

The subject is focused on understanding heredity principles especially mechanisms and regulation of transfer of genetic information and gene expression in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Special emphasis will be put on the main regulatory processes mediated by proteins and RNA regulatory molecules. Other focus is on understanding the variability of genetic information due to mutations and recombination. The subject offers information on the most important methods of DNA analysis as DNA identification and sequencing. The students will learn basic basic principles of pharmacogenomics and oncogenesis.

Syllabus

  1. Historic overview and basic genetic laws and terms.
  2. Structure and function of nucleic acids, genome organization
  3. Replication, DNA polymerases, replisome complex.
  4. Mutations and repair mechanisms.
  5. Recombination, gene segregation.
  6. Transposition, transduction, regulation of yeast mating type.
  7. Regulation of prokaryotic transcription.
  8. Eukaryotic transcription, posttranscriptional modifications of RNA.
  9. Regulatory roles of RNA.
  10. Translation.
  11. Comparison of prokaryotic and eukaryotic translation, post-translational modification.
  12. DNA analysis for identification of persons.
  13. Fundamentals of pharmacogenomics.
  14. Genetic principles of cancer.
2/0/0 Zk 3
B413003 Applied Statistics

Annotation

The Elementary Course of Statistics is aimed at undergraduate students. Students will learn basic statistical methods and gain insight into basic probability concepts.

Syllabus

  1. Probability of random events, independence of random events.
  2. Conditional probability, law of total probability, Bayes's theorem.
  3. Random variable, distribution function, probability function, density.
  4. Mean, variance, quantiles, median, critical values, independence and correlation of random variables.
  5. Fundamental types of discrete and continuous distributions.
  6. Random sample, sample statistics.
  7. Point estimates, confidence intervals.
  8. Testing of statistical hypotheses, type I and II errors. One-sample tests about mean and variance.
  9. Two-sample tests about means and variances.
  10. Independence testing.
  11. Goodness-of-fit testing.
  12. Contingency tables.
  13. Fundamentals of regression analysis.
  14. Summary, alternatively more specific statistical methods.
1/2/0 z, Zk 4
B143004 Bioinformatics seminar I

Annotation

In the course of the seminar, each student gets acquainted with the topic presented in selected scientific articles. The topic and methods should be close to his/her bachelor thesis. Based on the study of the articles, the student then prepares a written presentation. Besides that, he/she prepares and performs an oral presentation followed by discussion.

Syllabus

  1. Assignment of seminar projects
  2. Information resources in bioinformatics
  3. Graphical presentation of scientific data
  4. Publication process - peer review
  5. Publication process - technical details
  6. Presentation of results and rhetorics
  7. Project preparation and presentation
0/3/0 kz 3
B143001 Chemical Informatics

Annotation

Introductory course aimed at getting basic necessary skills for work with scientific chemistry literature, chemistry and multiple-fields databases. Hands-on training are integral part of the course, ensuring required skills are properly trained.

Syllabus

  1. Introduction, information flow in science
  2. Scholar article - structure, citations
  3. Identifiers of publications - ISBN, ISSN, DOI. Boole algebra, Internet search engines
  4. Citations, citation databases: Web of Science, Scopus
  5. Chemical structures - representation, identifiers, linear notation, connection tables, structure editors
  6. Chemical Abstracts - history, structure of the printed version. SciFinder - introduction, bibliographic searching
  7. Chemical Abstracts - chemical compounds - nomenclature, CAS RN, summary formulas. Bibliographic data for different types of processed documents. SciFinder - structure and reaction searching
  8. Beilstein and Gmelin - history. Reaxys database
  9. Patents - patenting procedure
  10. Standards - standards development, types of standards. ČSN, ISO, CEN
  11. Publishing process - past, present, future. Open access
  12. Copyright
  13. Excursion to joint ICT Prague and NTK library
1/1/0 kz 2
B320008 Bioinformatics programm Laboratory II

Annotation

The course provides training in the techniques used in routine molecular biology methods producing data, which are often subject to bioinformatics analysis. It aims at methods of isolation and analysis of DNA sequences and electrophoretic separation of target proteins. The course objectives further include: good laboratory practice, the rules of organization of an experiment and appropriate the interpretation of data.

Syllabus

  1. Operational safety in laboratory, good laboratory practice and recording an experiment
  2. Introduction to course organization and the proper use of specific labware and chemicals
  3. Small-scale izolation of plasmid DNA
  4. Restriction digestion of plasmid DNA
  5. Electrophoretic analysis of the fragments of digested plasmid
  6. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)
  7. Electrophoretic analysis to verify a PCR amplicon correct
  8. DNA sequencing reaction
  9. Analysis of sequencing products and reading the DNA sequence
  10. Preparation of an extract from cells producing a recombinant protein
  11. Electrophoretic separation of cell-free extract and of isolated recombinant protein
  12. Recording and interpretation of the electrophoreogram of separated proteins
  13. Discussion about optional experimental settings and their impact on results
  14. Completion of final report
0/0/2 kz 1
B500007  BI-VZD Data Mining

Annotation

Students are introduced to the basic methods of discovering knowledge in data. In particular, they learn the basic techniques of data preprocessing, multidimensional data visualization, statistical techniques of data transformation, and fundamental principles of knowledge discovery methods. Students will be aware of the relationships between model bias and variance, and know the fundamentals of assessing model quality. Data mining software is extensively used in the module. Students will be able to apply basic data mining tools to common problems (classification, regression, clustering).

Syllabus

  1. Introduction to data mining, data preparation, data visualization.
  2. Statistical analysis of data.
  3. Data model, nearest neighbour classifier.
  4. Training, validation and testing, model's quality evaluation.
  5. Artificial neural networks in data mining.
  6. Unsupervised neural networks - competitive learning
  7. Probability and Bayesian classification.
  8. Decision trees and rules.
  9. Neural networks with supervised learning.
  10. Cluster analysis.
  11. Combining neural networks and models in general.
  12. Data mining in the Clementine environment.
  13. Text mining, Web mining, selected applications, new trends.
2/2/0 z, Zk 4
B500005  BI-AAG Automata and Grammars

Annotation

Students are introduced to basic theoretical and implementation principles of the following topics: construction, use and mutual transformations of finite automata, regular expressions and regular grammars, translation finite automata, construction and use of pushdown automata, hierarchy of formal languages, Relationships between formal languages and automata. Knowledge acquired through the module is applicable in designs of algorithms for searching in text, data compression, simple parsing and translation, and design of digital circuits.

Syllabus

  1. Motivation to study formal languages. Basic notions (language, alphabet, grammar, automaton), Chomsky hierarchy.
  2. Nondeterministic and deterministic finite automata (NFA, DFA), NFA with epsilon transitions.
  3. Operations on automata (transformation to NFA without epsilon transitions, to DFA, minimization), intersection, union.
  4. Programming implementations of DFA and NFA, circuit implementations.
  5. Adding translation, Mealey, Moore, conversions.
  6. Operations on regular grammars, conversions to FA.
  7. Regular expressions, regular expression conversions, finite automata and regular grammars, Kleene theorem.
  8. Principles of use of regular expressions in UNIX (grep, egrep, perl, PHP, ...).
  9. Finite automaton as a lexical analyzer, lex/flex generators.
  10. Properties of regular languages (pumping lemma, Nerode theorem).
  11. Context-free languages, pushdown automaton.
  12. Parsing of context-free languages (nondeterministic versus deterministic).
  13. Context-sensitive and recursively enumerable languages, Turing machine.
2/2/0 z, Zk 6
B500006  BI-PHP.1 Programming in PHP

Annotation

The goal of the course is to acquaint students with the principles of dynamically generated server-side web pages. PHP programming language (types and definitions of variables, operators, arrays, loops, definitions and calls of functions, strings, regular expressions) and PHP code embedding into the HTML page are discussed. Students gain an insight into implementation of object oriented programming in PHP, inheritance and polymorphism in PHP, databases in the PHP environment, practical use of MySQL / SQLLite database system, and selected parts of PHP libraries.

Syllabus

  1. Basic syntax, data types (except OOP)
  2. Using IDE, debugging, workflow
  3. Variables, constants, expressions and control structures
  4. Functions, built-in functions (processing strings, regular expressions)
  5. Built-in functions (working with data types, I/O)
  6. Basics of OOP (class, interface, visibility, class loading)
  7. Using OOP (inheritance, traits, type hinting, late static binding, comparison of object, de/serialization)
  8. Namespaces
  9. Error handling - errors and exceptions
  10. Unit tests, integration tests (PHPUnit)
  11. Project dependencies, automatic class loading, Composer; Code profiling
  12. PHP7 new options
0/3/0 kz 4
Compulsorily optional courses
B403011 Computational Chemistry

Annotation

The course is an excursion to modern computational chemistry with a minimum of theory and a lot of practical examples. It covers both the quantum tutorial (program Gaussian), molecular simulation (MACSIMUS), computer biochemistry (PyMOL) and the properties of substances.

Syllabus

  1. Introduction to computational chemistry
  2. From electrons to molecules: potential energy and its calculation by the methods of quantum chemistry
  3. Structure of molecules and molecular complexes
  4. Energetics of chemical reactions in the gas phase and in solution (reaction energy, activation energy)
  5. Calculation of molecular properties (electrical properties, spectroscopic characteristics)
  6. Classical molecular modeling, description of molecules by the force field, structure and the radial distribution function
  7. Pseudoexperiments using Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics
  8. Laboratory of molecular dynamics I: model of NaCl, crystal, melt, melting temperature
  9. Laboratory of molecular dynamics II: solvation and water structure around different ions and non-polar solutes
  10. What is interesting in the world of modern genomics and proteomics
  11. Strukture bioinformatics and structural databases
  12. Visualizing biomolecules in the program PyMol
  13. Database of physico-chemical properties
  14. Seminar: presentation of student work
2/0/0 z 3
B402002 Analytical Chemistry II

Annotation

Lectures of Analytical Chemistry II extend and complement the basic overview of the methods discussed in the course Analytical Chemistry I. They focus primarily on understanding the principles of modern methods of instrumental analysis. The exercises are divided into two sections. The first involves the uncertainty of the quantitative analysis, the other is focused on the foundations of structural analysis - infrared spectrometry, proton NMR spectrometry, and mass spectrometry spectra will be solved.

Syllabus

  1. Uncertainties and testing of hypotheses in analytical chemistry
  2. Vibrational spectrometry - reflection IR, IR microscopy, NIR spectrometry, Raman spectrometry
  3. NMR spectrometry - relaxation, chemical exchange, NMR imaging
  4. Enhanced mass spectrometry
  5. Hyphenated techniques 1 - GC-MS, LC-MS, CE-MS
  6. Hyphenated techniques 2 - GC/LC-ICP-MS, speciation analysis; LC/GC-IR, LC-NMR
  7. Surface analysis 1 - by photons, electrons, ions
  8. Surface analysis 2 - by a probe (STM, AFM, SNOM)
  9. Analysis of chiral compounds - Introduction to chiral separation and chiroptic methods
  10. Kinetic methods of analysis
  11. Radioanalytical methods
  12. Biochemical analysis
  13. Chemical sensors and biosensors
  14. Process analysis
2/1/0 z, Zk 4

summer semester

CodeCourse nameP/C/LExaminationCredits
Compulsory courses
B963001 Bachelor Thesis 0/0/12 z 15
B500009 Advanced SQL

Annotation

Module is based on knowledge obtained in BI-DBS. Students become familiar with advanced relational and non- relational features of SQL language. In particular stored program unites, triggers, recursive queries, OLAP support, object-relational constructions. Part of the course is dedicated to practical database optimization from the point of view of specialized database structures like indexes, clusters, index-organized tables, and materialized views. as well as from the point of view query optimization. Execution plan and possibilities of its. changes will be discussed. Lectures will usually discuss SQL standard, but many features will be demonstrated on Oracle DBMS. Seminars are based on Oracle DBMS and partially on PostgreSQL.

Syllabus

  1. Program of seminars, organization, structure and requirements for semester project
  2. SQL review, MERGE, OLAP support
  3. Consultation to semester project, the first check point
  4. PL/SQL exercises
  5. Consultation to semester project, the second check point
  6. SQL query optimization, special tools for SQL query optimization
  7. Structures for fast data access
  8. PostgreSQL - SQL queries optimization basics, pgfounie script
  9. Consultation to semester project
  10. Object relational features, semester project evaluation
0/3/0 kz 4
B143005 Bioinformatics Seminar II

Annotation

In the Bioinformatics seminar II, students will be given the opportunity to discuss and solve scientific problems emerged during their work on the bachelor thesis. An important part of the seminar is also a "test run" of the bachelor's defense, i.e., the preparation of the presentation and its demonstration in front of the audience.

Syllabus

  1. Presentation of topics of bachelor theses
  2. Identification of problems during bachelor theses solving
  3. Consultations and problem solving
  4. Preparation of the bachelor defense
  5. Presentation of the bachelor thesis and its defense in front of the audience
0/3/0 kz 3
B143007 Web Technologies

Annotation

The course should give students overview of the main technologies involved in modern web communication. These comprise of markup languages XML and HTML5, their formal description in schema languages and technologies for their visual and dynamic presentation (CSS, ECMAScript, DOM) and an overview of related technologies (network protocols, server applications).

Syllabus

  1. History and philosophy of web technologies.
  2. The semantics in textual data: XML metalanguage, its structure and validation, namespaces, encoding of text, character entities.
  3. Querying the tree structure: selectors in CSS (plus úvod do CSS), XPath
  4. The object reprezentation of XML: DOM versus SAX, their usage in JavaScript and Python.
  5. HTML5: elements, its DOM representation, visualization via CSS, scripting with JavaScript.
  6. HTTP and other protocols, forms in HTML5, WSGI in Python.
  7. Selected web libraries.
2/0/0 Zk 3
Compulsorily optional courses
B403010 Theoretical Chemistry

Annotation

Introduction to modern particle-based methods of theoretical (computational) chemistry. The course covers basics od quantum chemistry, spectroscopy, statistical thermodynamics, kinetic theory, theory of chemical reactions, and molecular modeling and simulations.

Syllabus

  1. From electrons and nuclei to molecules to bulk phase: classical mechanics, quantum mechanics, and statistical mechanics.
  2. Schrödinger equation and the solution for a particle in a box: electron structure of polyenes and solids, tunneling.
  3. The origin of the chemical bond: electronic structure of atoms, Schrödinger equation for molecules and its solution.
  4. Structure of many-atom molecules and computational quantum chemistry: hybridization, Hückel method, ligand field, weak intermolecular interactions, potential energy surface, molecular symmetry.
  5. Watching molecules I: absorption and emission of radiation, rotational, IR, and Raman spectra, NMR, diffraction.
  6. Watching molecules II: electron spectroscopy, photochemistry, lasers.
  7. Electric, magnetic, and optical properties of molecules, intermolecular forces and molecular models.
  8. Principles of statistical thermodynamics I: ensembles, probability, Boltzmann distribution, mean values.
  9. Principles of statistical thermodynamics II: entropy and the partition function.
  10. Ideal gas: first-principle calculation of thermodynamic functions.
  11. Liquids and dense gases: virial expansion, structure and correlation functions.
  12. Kinetic theory of gases.
  13. Theory of chemical reactions: traveling on the potential energy surface, collision theory, transition state theory. Reaction mechanisms.
  14. Molecular simulations: Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics methods.
3/1/0 z, Zk 5
B110009 Fundamentals of Chemistry of Pharmaceuticals

Annotation

The aim of the lectures is to bring basic information in the chemistry of pharmaceuticals which should help the alumni to start their professional career in pharmaceutical industry (R&D, manufacture, Regulatory&Compliance etc.) and in the drug distribution. The introductory lectures cover general pharmaceutical chemistry: basic terms and definitions, primciples of mutual drug and organism interactions, drug design methods, registration of drugs, and good manufacturing practice. The main part of the lectures is devoted to a brief survey of structures and syntheses of the most frequently used drugs.

Syllabus

  1. Introduction. Basic terms and definitions
  2. Mutual drug and organism interactions. Basic terms in pharmacology
  3. Drug design methods. Registration of drugs. Good manufacturing practice
  4. Analgesics, antipyretics, anti-inflammatory agents
  5. Central nervous system drugs: anaesthetics, sedatives, hypnotics
  6. Central nervous system drugs: psychiatric drugs
  7. Autonomous nervous system drugs: sympathomimetics and sympatholytics
  8. Autonomous nervous systemdrugs: parasympathomimetics and parasympatholytics
  9. Local anaesthetics and relaxants
  10. Antihistamines and antiallergics. Antitussives and expectorants
  11. Cardiovascular system drugs
  12. Digestive tract therapeutic agents
  13. Antiinfective agents
  14. Chemotherapy of cancer
3/0/0 Zk 5